Modern World Literature in the Classroom

Paul Ugor
Paul Ugor is currently an Assitant Profesor of African Literatures and Cultures at Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois
Beginning mostly in the 1950s, this genre of literature is often by and about people from the former European colonies in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, South America, an...
Target Audience
This will be an ideal course for anyone interested in the humanities. High school instructors that teach English, Drama/Entertainment, film/visual arts, music, dance, and other forms of cultural texts will find this course extremely useful. Any instructor interested in incorporating the stories of people on the margins of society and issues of social justice ought to take this course.
8 reviews
8

Learning Areas

Teaching Standards

General Description

One of the remarkable things to happen in the global literary scene, especially beginning from the mid-twentieth Century, has been the explosion of literary productivity from the former colonies of European empires in Africa, the Caribbean, Asia, Latin America, and settler colonies such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other such places touched by imperial conquests. These growing constellations of writing have now come to be known globally as postcolonial literatures. This literature, often politically inclined, re-examines and problematizes the history of European colonization all over the world as it also reflects on its spiraling aftermath. The primary agenda of Postcolonial literature then, Ato Quayson tells us, involves ‘‘the representation of experiences of various kinds including those of slavery, migration, oppression and resistance, difference, race, gender, space and place, and the responses to the discourse of imperial Europe’’(Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature 06). This course examines the history, politics and poetics of this genre of world literature in English from the postcolony.
The aim of the course, then, is to train teachers on the ways in which they could introduce high school students/seniors to these genre of literature, especially as a way of creating intercultural dialogue in the classroom. We will examine some of the key writers, thinkers, texts, themes, trends, and discourses associated with postcolonialism, both as a cultural and intellectual project.

Audience

This will be an ideal course for anyone interested in the humanities. High school instructors that teach English, Drama/Entertainment, film/visual arts, music, dance, and other forms of cultural texts will find this course extremely useful. Any instructor interested in incorporating the stories of people on the margins of society and issues of social justice ought to take this course.

Available Delivery Formats

Format Description

The course is highly interactive with group discussions, in-class writing and lectures. It will also feature screenings of documentaries and short clips from YouTube.


This course contributes to 6.0 professional development hours.

Occurrences

There are no occurrences of Face to Face in Australia (NSW) at this time.

Sessions

What is Postcolonialism Anyway and Why Does it Matter in the Classroom?

No duration specified

What is Postcolonialism Anyway and Why Does it Matter in the Classroom?

1 hour

This session will introduce participants to the concept of postcolonialism. It will trace its history, meaning and breadth as a cultural and critical enterprise, and demonstrate why this genre of textual work matters in our high school classrooms.

Key Thinkers in Postclonalism--Frantz Fanon

1 hour and 10 minutes

This session will feature the screening of a documentary on the work of Franz Fanon, a leading thinker in postcolonial studies. The documentary, “Black Skin, White Mask” is a based on Fanon’s book of the same title and introduces participants to some of the key issues taken by postcolonialism. The documentary, about 50 minutes long, will be followed by a 15 minutes group discussion and then a general discussion by the entire class. Participants will be prompted to talk about the ways in which the film raises or addressees some of the issues that their students struggle with in the classroom.

Key Thinkers in Postclonalism--Edward Said

1 hour and 30 minutes

This session will introduce participants to the work of Edward Said. The session will begin with a screening of a documentary on Said’s idea of Orientalism followed by a short lecture and discussion on the film. The film raises crucial questions about the power of cultural representation, especially the ways in which representations provide a template for how people are managed, controlled and dealt with in everyday life. It will address issues of stereotypes, racial prejudice and how to deconstruct and subvert such representations in the classroom.

Voices from the Trenches

40 minutes

The aim of this session is to allow participants an opportunity to offer different accounts of the ways in which they encounter cultural tensions in the classroom. Participants may offer anecdotes of encounters with students, colleagues or any other situations where they witnessed charged encounters between people rooted in racial or cultural prejudices. the idea here is to demonstrate how postcolonialism offers us an outlet to preempt such tensions in the classroom and everyday life. In other words, this session demonstrates how postcolonial texts might help us deal with the cultural contestations inherent in our society and promote tolerance in the classroom, thus preparing our students to do same outside of the classroom?

Textaul Analysis

1 hour and 20 minutes

This session will aim at demonstrating how to analyze postcolonial texts for high school students. We will use at least two primary texts as samples for this session. The idea here is not only to show how to teach postcolonial texts, but also how to highlight some of the key questions and issues that postcolonial texts address.

Sample Postcolonial Texts

40 minutes

This is essential the concluding segment of the course. It will feature a discussion on some of the key texts in postcolonial studies that participants could teach in their school. Titles, authors and short summaries of texts will be provided. This will be followed by a general Q&A session.

What To Bring

All participants will be required to bring all the recommended readings sent out prior to the date of the seminar. Of course they will also be required to come with their writing materials such as notebooks, writing pads, etc.

User Rating

4.9

Latest Reviews

Please note the feedback listed here is unfiltered, and includes all comments and ratings collected.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
by Joanne Davison on 21/03/2018

This is without doubt the most engaging and intellectually stimulating PD course I have attended in my 32 years of teaching! I feel I have learned so much today.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
by Sylvia Morris on 21/03/2018

This was without doubt the most insightful PD I’ve ever attended. Engaging, challenging and mentally stimulating. Couldn’t recommend it any higher.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
by Helen Barrie on 21/03/2018

It is such a privilege to have a learned and fantastic Teacher who understands the importance of teaching us to teach others.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
by Naomi Tsvirko on 21/03/2018

An insightful presentation. Paul is such a passionate speaker who provokes both thought and open discussion.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
21/03/2018

Challenging and engaging overall. Maybe include a little more on classroom texts.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
21/03/2018

Mastery of content and well presented. Covered complex content with great enthusiasm.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
21/03/2018

Thoroughly engaging and thought provoking. Both challenging and insightful.

Modern World Literature in the Classroom
20/03/2018

Excellent presentation, however, the Fanon movie was a bit difficult to follow.


About the team


Paul Ugor

Creator

Paul Ugor is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois. His research interests are in Anglophone World Literatures, Postcolonial Studies, Cultural Theory, New Media Cultures in the Global South; and Modern African Literatures and Cultures. Some of his publications include Nollywood: Popular Video Films and New Narratives of Youth Struggles in Nigeria (Sept. 2016); African Youth Cultures in the Age of Globalization: Challenges, Agency and Resistance (Ashgate, August 2015); Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa, Special Issue of Postcolonial Text. Vol. 8, No 3&4, 2013; and Youth, Cultural Politics and New Social Spaces in an Era of Globalization, Special Issue of Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies 31:4, (September 2009). Dr Ugor’s courses are very much concerned with the multiple ways in which postcolonial literatures can create intercultural dialogue in high school classrooms. His research and teaching interests in general are concerned with new social processes—in global politics, economy, information and communication technologies, cultural/textual representations, and everyday life—and the new social responses which these social changes elicit, especially from marginal groups like youth and women in postcolonial settings